Literary doodle pad

Archive for March, 2012

What a friend!

At some point I’ll have to write more about this whole area but for now a quick post about something that went on last week;

Ben, Phillipa, Charlie and I met up at the Monument in the city centre on Wednesday to see what God wanted us to do. When we met we sat at a bench and prayed for a bit and asked God to give us some clues, we then wrote down things which God brought to mind. After that we just asked God to guide us and kept praying as we went. We believe that God can heal people of emotional, physical and spiritual sickness and that He loves people very much, so we were looking for opportunities to pray for people. We offered prayer to quite a few people, a few of whom declined, a lot of people had various needs in their lives though and were quite touched by the fact that God loves them enough to send some young people into the city to look for them and pray for them.

Anyway, let me just share a couple of snippets of how it went. :]

So we offered to pray for a woman who said she was an atheist but when we told her that God loves atheists as well she said we could pray for her spine; so Ben and I did (we split into twos) and when we had prayed she said she had a tingly feeling in the bottom of her spine and in her bottom, and then she asked if we would pray for her to be able to quit smoking too which we did and I am still praying for her by name (Joules) which you can too if you’d like.

Phillipa also had been given a ‘clue’ by God which was simply ‘Butterfly’, well we saw a group of young people hanging out in front of a shop called ‘M Butterfly’ and there was a girl in the group that I kept feeling my heart go out for, so again Ben and I approached the group and said something like ‘Hello, we are Ben and Catie, we’re Christians and we believe God loves you and we’d like to offer to pray for you, is there anything we can pray for you for?’ they looked a bit nervous and giggled a bit and one of the girls said she didn’t believe in God, and so we said to the girl who I’d felt God urging us to talk to that we had particularly felt that God wanted to bless her and her face lit up, her friend tried to drag her away but she said she wanted to stay and told us she was two weeks pregnant and could we pray for that, she was so young to be a mother and looked quite worried about it so I asked if she’d mind me putting a hand on her and prayed with her.

Meanwhile Ben was chatting to a couple of the boys; One was joking around and thought the whole thing pretty ridiculous but the other one of them said that his friend’s hand had been healed before when he’d been prayed for and said he had a sore leg. Ben prayed for him, commanding the pain to go in Jesus’ name and then the boy moved his leg about and was amazed as the pain had completely gone, at which point the other boy thought it would be okay to have his sore knuckles be prayed for, so Ben got the boy who had just been healed to lay hands on him and pray as well and then this second lad said that he had no pain in his knuckles, Ben and I hardly believed it so Ben checked and said we’d not be offended if they did still hurt but the boy said that they didn’t hurt at all anymore! Amazing!!

So basically, be encouraged: Jesus loves you completely and has the power to heal you and your friends and He will meet you where you are at. He’s a really awesome friend to have, too good to miss out on. :] xx

M-Butterfly, Newcastle

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Being a Rah (for a day)

Typically I am known for my slightly obscure and offensively bright clothing with at least a hint of hippy-ish-ness influencing my wardrobe, fairly accurately depicted by this picture:-

 

However, as a student at Newcastle University I don’t really fit in at all, and the vast majority of the students here are what we would call a ‘Rah’, people from upper-middle or middle class backgrounds who tend to all wear the same things as each other, namely very expensive branded things of a particular style. My friends and I thought it would be an interesting social experiment for me to ‘dress up’ as a ‘rah’ for a day, resulting in the following image:-



 

Findings:-

Deciding what exactly a rah wears was harder than expected, maybe they’re not quite so uniform as we might mock them for being after all.

 

Maximum effort made to make hair puffy and stay on top of my head in an ‘arranged mess’ and makeup = much more effort too; eyes started watering in response to excess blackness! (note, if I’d been doing it properly I’d have plastered foundation and bronzer on too but I coudn’t bring myself to do it/didn’t own the required make-up items). I Think so many Rah girls are probably really stunning on a morning before they’ve put on their mask.

 

People’s reactions when you change something about yourself, even just as shallow as your clothes, can be totally hillarious; people find change quite spooky. On the whole more boys thought the change was bad, more girls said I looked nice, almost everyone thought it was funny.

 

Rah clothes are REALLY WARM!! Gillets, despite being armless, are super cosy! And UGG boots are frankly BOILING.

 

Cath Kidston handbags and red skinny jeans are as colourful as you get when being rah (do quite like the bag though).

 

Your clothes must imply that you live in a massive house in the country where you go hunting, shooting, fishing for sport (though the UGG boots might give away the fact that you never actually get your feet dirty) and your clothes probably never convey any messages about social justice (or any other message apart from status and wealth).

 

Got less weird looks than usual on my walk into uni.

 

If you dress up as a nice rah girl then nice rah boys will offer to open doors for you.

 

Felt a weird kind of power in blending in at the Uni Library, in the idea that I was fooling all these people around me that I was just like them (they couldn’t tell I wasn’t cause the library is a quiet place).

 

The charity collectors on northumbarland street who usually all stop me didn’t stop me at all on rah day.

 

People who hate you for being a hippy will hate you anyway even if you conform, people who accept you as you are will laugh along and accept you when you dress as a rah (but they’ll still prefer you to be yourself).

 

It’s refreshing when some people don’t notice what you’re wearing and just chat away to you as normal.

 

Being someone else for a day is fun, but exhausting.

 

I want to judge people by their appearance as little as possible from now on.

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